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Today is 09.25.2016

Gospel Singer Goes From Homelessness To Top Charts | Atlanta | San Francisco Chronicle

James Fortune used to watch his children sleep in the bathtub before he lay beside his pregnant wife at night in a motel, wondering how he was going to provide for his family the next day.

For the gospel singer, being homeless for seven months in 2007 was the most strenuous stint of his life. The constant letdown of watching others get hired for jobs while he and his wife Cheryl went overlooked weakened his faith. He asked in a prayer why God seemingly abandoned them during their most stressful time.

But during his prayer, Fortune said he went from being emotionally stifled to at peace. That’s when he was led to write the words to his 2009 hit song, “I Trust You,” which topped the Gospel National Airplay chart for 28 straight weeks

“I questioned God,” he recalled.

“It seemed like God wasn’t even there and had forgotten about us because we saw other people get hired and prospering,” he continued. “It seemed like the lowest point. But in that situation, God gave me the song that changed my life.”

The 32-year-old Fortune and his ensemble called F.I.Y.A (Free In Yahweh’s Abundance) recently released their fourth album “Identity,” which debuted in the top spot on Billboard’s Gospel, Christian and Independent album charts. He is a rising a star in the genre and has opened concerts for some of gospel’s best, including Kirk Franklin, Shirley Caesar, Yolanda Adams and Fred Hammond.

Last year, Fortune launched FIYA World Music Group with his wife, who is the vice president of the record label. Life is totally different these days for the Fortunes, who are now have their own home in Houston.

“It’s a beautiful testimony,” Franklin said of the Fortunes. “It’s amazing how God takes people that have had horrible experiences and (they) use it as a tool to write songs and music that will speak to other people who are going through the same things. It’s amazing how God takes lemons and makes them into lemonade.”

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via San Francisco Chronicle